Speaking Topics for Mental Health Professionals

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Speaking Topics for Mental Health Professionals – Descriptions

Myths and Truths About Resilience in Children and Families

“Children are resilient” is a popular saying, but it fails to capture the complexity of children’s responses to adverse experiences or the mechanisms contributing to their well-being. This presentation examines common myths, deeper truths, and clinical strategies related to promoting resilience in children and families.

Treating the Emotional Side of Parenting

Few things in life evoke more intense emotions than being a parent. People expect that having kids will make them happy, yet aggregate data and daily experience often tell a different story. The flip side of the intense love that most people feel for their children is the intense anger, fear, and guilt that often emerges in or from parent-child interactions. This presentation offers clinicians practical strategies for helping parents cope with their own and their children’s emotions. It focuses on ways to increase family harmony and to help clients become the kind of parents they want to be.

Lifting the Burden of Potential

For bright children, a focus on achievement too often eclipses other aspects of their development. Because they can perform, and that performance seems so important to everyone around them, they may start to believe that they are the performance. Whether they are generally good students, officially labeled “gifted,” or routinely admonished that they “could do better” if only they tried, many of these children feel burdened by expectations and terrified of failure. Drawing from research and clinical experience, this presentation offers practical strategies to help bright children cope with perfectionism, build connection with their peers, and find joy.

Inspiring Motivation in Children

For bright children, a focus on achievement too often eclipses other aspects of their development. Because they can perform, and that performance seems so important to everyone around them, they may start to believe that they are the performance. Whether they are generally good students, officially labeled “gifted,” or routinely admonished that they “could do better” if only they tried, many of these children feel burdened by expectations and terrified of failure. Drawing from research and clinical experience, this presentation offers practical strategies to help bright children cope with perfectionism, build connection with their peers, and find joy.